Latest News of the Week
Dear readers, The Kushtia Times, only English weekly newspaper in Khulna division is now available online on epaper version. Please stay with us. All the best. Editor-publisher

BBC boss resigns

Times National Desk - November 12th, 2012

The BBC’s director general, George Entwistle, has resigned in the wake of the Newsnight child abuse broadcast.
In a statement given outside New Broadcasting House, Entwistle said: “I have decided that the honourable thing to do is to step down.”
Earlier, Entwistle said Newsnight’s report, which led to Thatcher-era Tory Lord McAlpine being wrongly implicated, should not have been broadcast.
The broadcast covered cases of child abuse at north Wales care homes.
Entwistle took up the post of director general on September 17, and his sudden resignation makes him the shortest-ever serving BBC director general.
In his statement, he said: “In the light of the fact that the director general is also the editor in chief and ultimately responsible for all content, and in the light of the unacceptable journalistic standards of the Newsnight film broadcast on Friday 2 November, I have decided that the honourable thing to do is to step down from the post of director general.”
‘Great honour’
He said that when he was appointed to the role, he was confident BBC trustees had chosen the best candidate for the post and the “right person to tackle the challenges and opportunities ahead”.
“However the wholly exceptional events of the past few weeks have led me to conclude that the BBC should appoint a new leader,” he said.
George Entwistle said he was stepping down because as director general of the BBC he was also its editor in chief.
He said it was the honourable thing to do after a BBC Newsnight film alleged child abuse by an unnamed Conservative politician – which was proved to be unfounded.
Coming on top of the Jimmy Savile crisis, which was prompted partly by the fact that Newsnight had shelved an earlier investigation into allegations of child abuse, this was particularly damaging to the BBC.
But this was also about the handling of the crisis. Last month, Mr Entwistle was accused by MPs of showing “an extraordinary lack of curiosity” over the Jimmy Savile affair and they told him to “get a grip”.
On Saturday in an interview on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, he said he knew nothing in advance about the Newsnight broadcast nor had he seen a newspaper report revealing Lord McAlpine may have been wrongly accused.
MPs, former editors and broadcasting executives were unimpressed and so, I understand, were members of the BBC Trust.
On Sunday, the job of acting director-general will be taken by Tim Davie, who’s been running the radio side of the BBC but who has no direct journalistic experience.
The BBC still faces very serious questions, not just about its journalism but about how the organisation is run.
This crisis – one of the most serious in the BBC’s history – is not yet over.